Located at 1767 95th Street in Beverly Hills, Chicago      •      Email: upfallartstation@gmail.com     Tel: 708-897-1375

JAMES MILLER

Portraits

RECEPTION
7-10 PM

28

June

Dates: 06/09 - 06/28

Total Duration:

Thursdays 6pm-whenever

Saturdays, 09:00am - 1:00pm

Sundays, 09:00am - 1:00pm

Portraiture is tricky.

 

The camera tells a story written in light and shadow, and rarely is that story true to life. When taking someone's picture, the photographer can strive to capture a person's essence, or choose instead to create a story entirely separate from the personality of the model.

 

In this series, James Miller (@theraceofpablo) creates a collection of visual portraiture that strays from truth and strict representation, entering the realm of beauty for beauty's sake. 

 

Figures trapped in plastic, on stakeout, lost in the woods...

It's all a lie, and in that lie, it's all true.

JAMES MILLER

The Process of Change

RECEPTION
5-9 PM

27

July

Dates: 07/16 - 07/30

Total Duration:

Thursdays 6pm-whenever

Saturdays, 09:00am - 1:00pm

Sundays, 09:00am - 1:00pm

The day President Trump announced the Muslim ban, I was screen printing. It wasn't difficult for me to channel my reaction into a print. I hand-cut tracing paper stencils, and whipped out my reaction like a six-shooter in the westerns my grandpa used to watch. Several hours later, I had a stack of finished, but wildly unpolished works, that contained more anger than meaning. Our lady liberty, a symbol of welcome to all, now seemed to me a rage-filled protestor, standing in front of the President's city, holding her torch aloft as if to say "I still welcome them."

 

A week later, I revisited the prints, inverting the statue to be correctly viewed on the screen, and while I was working, I remembered an article I'd read in the Smithsonian in 2015, where it made the point that the original sketches for Lady Liberty were of a northern African Egyptian woman. A muslim woman. This resonated with me, and I envisioned the Statue of Liberty with a headscarf superimposed on the surface.

 

At that point, I approached the Muslim Student Association at SXU and presented the work I had completed to date. I opened it up to criticism, as I don't want to speak for a group of people, certainly not without their feedback.

 

The feedback sessions went really well, and I incorporated the elements discussed into the third and final design. One of the key changes was the addition of a photo emulsion layer, modeled by Hiba, one of my friends from SXU. I named the piece #muslimban Liberty.

 

Since debuting the poster, I've been asked to share the process at several mosques in Chicagoland, and I plan to add two additional prints to the series, #muslimban Life and #muslimban The Pursuit of Happiness.